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Dear Friend,

Myanmar’s military junta extended Nobel Peace laureate and pro-democracy leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s imprisonment by 18 months today after finding her guilty of violating the terms of her house arrest.

Critics of Myanmar’s military regime condemned the outcome of the 3-month sham trial,^1 calling it a pretext to keep Suu Kyi out of the running during next year’s presidential elections.^2

The junta — which currently detains more than 2,100 political prisoners — commuted Suu Kyi’s sentence from three years hard labor in prison to an 18-month extension to her house arrest in the hopes that the international community will view the reduced sentence as an act of leniency.

*But Suu Kyi should have never been imprisoned in the first place.*

Suu Kyi’s deplorable imprisonment has been denounced by everyone from heads of state worldwide to nine of Suu Kyi’s fellow Nobel laureates.
Join the court of world opinion in condemning Daw Ang San Suu Kyi’s sham trial.
<http://www.kintera.org/TR.asp?a=cgLNIZNALbIMKaJ&s=8nJEIPNpFaIEJLPnEjE&m=kuLQJ3NNLlI8H>
Tell the leader of Myanmar’s military junta that Suu Kyi shouldn’t serve another minute of her sentence.

We know that the odds of success may seem stacked against us any time we appeal to authoritarian rulers. But the recent release of two U.S.
journalists from North Korea is proof that *even totalitarian regimes are vulnerable to relentless international pressure.*

The fact that Myanmar’s government reduced Suu Kyi’s sentence is also a sign that the military regime is susceptible to the world community’s
criticisms.^3

*We’ve proven time after time that even military dictatorships and other repressive regimes are no match for Amnesty’s millions-strong global
movement.* Just last year, Ma Khin Khin Leh, another prisoner of conscience in Myanmar, obtained her release after Amnesty activists sent tens of thousands of letters to Myanmar’s leaders on her behalf.

Join us today in calling for Daw Ang San Suu Kyi’s immediate release.
<http://www.kintera.org/TR.asp?a=fjITI8PMJeKTIkI&s=8nJEIPNpFaIEJLPnEjE&m=kuLQJ3NNLlI8H>

Thank you for standing with us,

— Anil, Nancy, Jim, Ulana and the rest of the Myanmar rapid response team

Take Action Now!
<http://www.kintera.org/TR.asp?a=iwKZJhMYIhJ0JuL&s=8nJEIPNpFaIEJLPnEjE&m=kuLQJ3NNLlI8H>
1, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8194596.stm
2, http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/12/world/asia/12myanmar.html
3, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8194868.stm

Bishop Desmond Tutu was born in 1931 in Klerksdorp, Transvaal. His father was a teacher, and he himself was educated at Johannesburg Bantu High School. After leaving school he trained first as a teacher at Pretoria Bantu Normal College and in 1954 he graduated from the University of South Africa. After three years as a high school teacher he began to study theology, being ordained as a priest in 1960. The years 1962-66 were devoted to further theological study in England leading up to a Master of Theology. From 1967 to 1972 he taught theology in South Africa before returning to England for three years as the assistant director of a theological institute in London. In 1975 he was appointed Dean of St. Mary’s Cathedral in Johannesburg, the first black to hold that position. From 1976 to 1978 he was Bishop of Lesotho, and in 1978 became the first black General Secretary of the South African Council of Churches. Tutu is an honorary doctor of a number of leading universities in the USA, Britain and Germany.

Desmond Tutu has formulated his objective as “a democratic and just society without racial divisions”, and has set forward the following points as minimum demands:

1. equal civil rights for all
2. the abolition of South Africa’s passport laws
3. a common system of education
4. the cessation of forced deportation from South Africa to the so-called “homelands”

The South African Council of Churches is a contact organization for the churches of South Africa and functions as a national committee for the World Council of Churches. The Boer churches have disassociated themselves from the organization as a result of the unambiguous stand it has made against apartheid. Around 80 percent of its members are black, and they now dominate the leading positions.

 

Selected Bibliography
By Tutu
Crying in the Wilderness. The Struggle for Justice in South Africa. Edited by John Webster. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Eerdmans, 1982. (Sermons, speeches, articles, press statements, 1978-1980.)
Hope and Suffering: Sermons and Speeches. Edited by John Webster. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Eerdmans, 1984. (From the period 1976-1982.)
The Rainbow People of God: The Making of a Peaceful Revolution. Edited by John Allen. New York: Doubleday, 1994. (Speeches, letters and sermons from 1976 to 1994, woven together in narrative by his media secretary.)
 
Other Sources
du Boulay, Shirley. Tutu, Voice of the Voiceless. London: Penguin Books, 1989.
Sparks, Allister. The Mind of South Africa. New York: Knopf, 1990. (Historical interpretation by a distinguished South African journalist.)

From Nobel Lectures, Peace 1981-1990, Editor-in-Charge Tore Frängsmyr, Editor Irwin Abrams, World Scientific Publishing Co., Singapore, 1997

This autobiography/biography was written at the time of the award and first published in the book series Les Prix Nobel. It was later edited and republished in Nobel Lectures. To cite this document, always state the source as shown above.

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Dietrich Bonhoeffer

We must act and dare the appropiateness and not whatever comes to our mind not floating in the likelihood but grasp the reality as brave as we can be freedom lies in action not in the absence of mind obedience knows the essence of good and satisfies it, freedom dares to act and returns God the ultimate judgment of what is right and what is wrong, Obedience performs blindly but Freedom is wide awake Freedom wants to know why, Obedience has its hands tied, Freedom is inventive obedient man respects God’s commands and by virtu of his Freedom, he creats new commands. Both Obedience and Freedom come true in responsability (Dietrich Bonhoeffer)

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